P688: Before, during and after class activities in introductory chemistry: Theory and web site

Author: Michael R. Abraham, Oklahoma State University, USA

Co-Author: John I. Gelder, Oklahoma State University, USA; Thomas J. Greenbowe, Iowa State University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 11:10 AM11:30 AM

Room: LTT 102

Related Symposium: S17

As a result of funding from the National Science Foundation CCLI-EMD (TUES) we have been adding to an existing collection of inquiry-oriented activities that can be used in a large lecture environment (although the activities are not limited to the large lecture environment). The activities are based on a Learning Cycle approach and engage students Before Class, During Class and After Class. The Before Class activities are web-based and are used to either generate data that is used During Class to invent concepts, or as a means of determining student prior knowledge of the topic to be discussed. During Class students work in small groups using a written activity or under the instructor’s direction to invent a concept. After class another web-based activity allows students to demonstrate their understanding of the invented concept. In the first paper we will describe the theoretical basis for the activities and introduce the project web site where the activities are available for use in your classroom.

P689: Before, during and after class activities in introductory chemistry: Activities and exemplar

Author: John I. Gelder, Oklahoma State University, USA

Co-Author: Michael R. Abraham, The University of Oklahoma, USA; Thomas J. Greenbowe, Iowa State University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 11:30 AM11:50 AM

Room: LTT 102

Related Symposium: S17

As a result of funding from the National Science Foundation CCLI-EMD (TUES) we have been adding to an existing collection of inquiry-oriented activities that can be used in a large lecture environment (although the activities are not limited to the large lecture environment). The activities are based on a Learning Cycle approach and engage students Before Class, During Class and After Class. The Before Class activities are web-based and are used to either generate data that is used During Class to invent concepts, or as a means of determining student prior knowledge of the topic to be discussed. During Class students work in small groups using a written activity or under the instructor’s direction to invent a concept. After class another web-based activity allows students to demonstrate their understanding of the invented concept. The second paper will dwell on a specific example of how we are using computer simulations and Before Class, During Class and After Class activities to develop a concept with students in a large lecture environment.

P690: Computer simulations, animations and guided-inquiry activities for general chemistry

Author: Thomas J. Greenbowe, Iowa State University, USA

Co-Author: John I. Gelder, Oklahoma State University, USA; Michael R. Abraham, University of Oklahoma, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 11:50 AM12:10 PM

Room: LTT 102

Related Symposium: S17

Computer simulations and animations, when properly integrated into an instructional module, can potentially provide teachers with a powerful teaching tool. Our Next Infinity Project integrates the use of web-based computer simulations with guided-inquiry activities based on a Learning Cycle approach. “Before”, “During”, and “After” activities are used to help students gain a better understating of concepts in general chemistry. Instead of doing readings or assigned end-of-chapter homework problems in a textbook, computer simulations and scenarios help student’s structure and carry out experiments designed to answer researchable questions. During class students work in small groups to generate and analyze pooled data. The instructor can then use the data to invent a concept. After class students can then apply the concept. A beta version of a computer scenario will be presented along with an accompanying activity.

P680: Use of a science writing heuristic experiment as the model for a POGIL classroom activity

Author: Brandon Fetterly, University of Wisconsin-Richland, USA

Co-Author: Kathy A. Burke and Thomas J. Greenbowe, Iowa State University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 10:35 AM10:55 AM

Room: MAN 122

Related Symposium: S15

The use of models to build student understanding distinguishes a classroom utilizing POGIL from traditional classrooms. In current published activities, models are presented to students through written material or printed figures. In order to better develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, the observations gained in an exploratory laboratory experiment utilizing the Science Writing Heuristic are used to build the model for a POGIL classroom activity in the following session. The key tasks in the SWH of communicating observations and cooperating to develop claims based on evidence helps to form the model in the mind of the learner. Reflective reading creates a link to classroom work. This methodology will be shown using observations from an electrochemistry experiment to build a model for classroom work on the activity series.

P605: Combining lecture demonstrations, computer simulations, clicker questions using a guided-inquiry approach to provide an opportunity for students to increase their conceptual understanding of topics in general chemistry

Author: David Randy Sullivan, University of Oregon, USA

Co-Author: Deborah Berkshire Exton and Thomas J. Greenbowe, University of Oregon, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 4:20 PM4:40 PM

Room: MAK BLL 126

Related Symposium: S47

Lecture demonstrations continue to play a role in the college general chemistry curriculum. We have developed a series of interactive in-class activities for teaching the following topics: classification of chemistry reactions, gas laws and the kinetic molecular theory, phase changes for carbon dioxide, solubility and intermolecular forces, trends in reactivity of metals, and factors influencing rates of reactions. We use a guided-inquiry approach to our lecture demonstrations. Each lecture demonstration is integrated into the class activities. Prior to each of the demonstrations, students are asked to predict what will happen using clickers. Computer simulations of the demonstration at the particulate nature of matter are shown and then students observe the demonstration (exploration phase). Students are then introduced to the concept. Students apply their knowledge in a slightly different context (application phase). Our presentation will show how the clicker questions, demonstrations and computer animations are presented to students. We will also discuss preliminary data on the effectiveness of this approach comparing students’ performance on the clicker questions to their performance on conceptual questions on the hour exams and final exams.

P137: Guided inquiry experiment for teaching thermochemical concepts based on green chemistry principles

Author: Brandi L. Baldock, University of Oregon, USA

Co-Author: Deborah Berkshire Exton and Thomas J. Greenbowe, University of Oregon, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 9:55 AM10:15 AM

Room: LMH 114

Related Symposium: S7

University General Chemistry is a required course for most STEM majors. Students find the material difficult to understand due to the inclusion of mathematical techniques and abstract science concepts and principles. The manner in which the material is presented in lecture (didactic versus inquiry), and the manner in which the students perform laboratory activities (verification versus inquiry) both have an impact on the relative success of students. We have implemented a series of inquiry-based laboratory activities in our General Chemistry laboratory course at the University of Oregon. In this presentation, we will describe a new laboratory experiment that uses inquiry-based learning activities involving sustainable materials and green chemistry principles to teach students about thermochemical concepts. This talk will focus on the influence these activities have on student understanding of thermochemical concepts, as assessed by their performance in the new ACS Computer Scenario Laboratory Exam.