P512: Materials, nanotechnology and biomimicry for renewable energy and ecological design

Author: Susan Sutheimer, Green Mountain College, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 2:25 PM2:45 PM

Room: MAN 102

Related Symposium: S2

A course designed for students majoring in Renewable Energy and Ecological Design drew heavily from the materials and methods acquired from workshops in Renewable Energy and in Materials Science and Nanotechnology. Students related the principles of nanotechnology to Biomimicry to better comprehend the principles behind why geckos can walk on ceilings and why filefish exhibit anisotropic oleophobicity. Nanotechnology was also used to explain color changes in quantum dots and the many potential uses of carbon nanotubes. Since the students were majoring in renewable energy, information and labs on semiconductors, solar cells, spectroscopy, biodiesel, corn ethanol and LEDs were easily adopted from the Workshop on Renewable Energy. Coupled with field trips to the college’s biomass plant, a CowPower farm and a recycling facility, the course provided stimulating lecture and hands-on experiences at an institution known for its emphasis on environmental sustainability.

P97: Developing climate change activities in general chemistry

Author: Karen Anderson, Madison College, USA (Presented by: Daniel King, Drexel University, USA)

Co-Author: Daniel King, Drexel University, USA; Jennifer E Lewis and Janelle Arjoon, University of South Florida, USA; Douglas Latch, Seattle University, USA; Susan Sutheimer, Green Mountain College, USA; Gail Webster, Guilford College, USA; Cathy Middlecamp, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA; Richard Moog, Franklin and Marshall College, USA

Date: 8/3/14

Time: 2:25 PM2:45 PM

Room: MAN 122

Related Symposium: S15

Through an NSF-funded project, collaborators from a variety of different types of institutions have written a series of in-class activities that use climate-change topics to teach general chemistry concepts via the POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) approach. It is expected that these new activities will help engage students in learning fundamental general chemistry topics while establishing connections to climate-change concepts. Classroom testing began in Spring 2013. Feedback from the testing is being used to inform revisions to the parts of the activities that develop process skills such as information processing, communication and teamwork. This talk will show the key components of a sample activity and report on insights and challenges gained through preliminary feedback on this set of integrated activities.

P40: Pitfalls and (some) solutions for introducing green chemistry into the general chemistry lab

Author: Susan Sutheimer, Green Mountain College, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/3/14

Time: 2:05 PM2:25 PM

Room: LMH 114

Related Symposium: S7

Finances, unyielding established faculty members, and long-established brown laboratory procedures are all roadblocks to introducing green chemistry in undergraduate courses. This talk will examine a few ways to circumvent or solve these and other problems using examples from Green Mountain College’s chemistry program and from the green chemistry community.