P851: Guided inquiry experiments for the physical chemistry lab

Author: Sally Hunnicutt, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

Co-Author: Alex Grushow, Rider University, USA; Robert Whitnell, Guilford College, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 2:45 PM3:05 PM

Room: MAN 123

Related Symposium: S56

The NSF-funded POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. We describe in detail two of the POGIL-PCL experiments that have been reviewed and tested at a variety of institutions. The first, “How does the composition of a mixture affect its melting point?,” is a re-invention of the traditional solid-mixtures phase diagram experiment using fatty acids. The second, “Which apple would be best for fruit salad?,” probes the enzyme catalyzed oxidation of catechol using enzyme extracted from apples. In each experiment students follow two learning cycles and work as a class to make predictions, select the appropriate parameters to vary or compare, carry out a general protocol, and analyze their results. We will present typical student results and discussion for these experiments. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF (DUE 1044624).

P852: Guided inquiry in physical chemistry lab at UMass increases engagement

Author: Ruthanne H. Paradise, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA

Co-Author: Sally S. Hunnicutt, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 3:05 PM3:25 PM

Room: MAN 123

Related Symposium: S56

The implementation of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) style labs in the University of Massachusetts physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) has made a notable difference in the engagement of students during and after the lab. This year one traditional style experiment was replaced by a POGIL-PCL experiment under development based on that traditional experiment. In addition, most of the labs were revised to ask the students to form hypotheses about the outcomes of the experiments before attending lab, and asked them questions along the way to completing the traditional physical chemistry experiments. The change in engagement during oral reports was striking. Most students were more comfortable with the material and could more easily answer questions about the experiment (“why,” “how,” “what does that mean,” etc.) without struggling because they had been provided the tools to take the steps from the experimental results to understanding the material. We believe that the reason for this is the revised experiments introduced more step-by-step questions and pre-lab hypothesis forming that caused the students to engage in conversation during class about why certain results should or shouldn’t occur. I observed lively debate between students about the hypothesis they had formed before coming to class or asked about during the laboratory period; they also made connections more easily because they were given the roadmap to find the solutions rather than the simple directive of carry out the experiment and talk about the results.

P679: Development and implementation of guided-inquiry experiments for physical chemistry: The POGIL-PCL project

Author: Rob Whitnell, Guilford College, USA

Co-Author: Sally Hunnicutt, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA; Alex Grushow, Rider University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 10:15 AM10:35 AM

Room: MAN 122

Related Symposium: S15

The NSF-funded POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. POGIL principles have been used to develop inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments that emphasize modeling of both macroscopic and molecular chemical phenomena. Project results include physical chemistry experiments in areas such as chemical kinetics, phase transition behavior, equilibrium thermodynamics, spectroscopy, and computational chemistry. We have also employed workshops to build a community of instructors who are currently working together to develop, review, refine, beta-test and implement experiments in a variety of undergraduate environments. In this presentation, we describe the general structure of a POGIL physical chemistry experiment and give an overview of experiment development and implementation. We also discuss ways in which interested physical chemistry laboratory instructors can become involved in the POGIL-PCL project. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF (DUE 1044624).

P213: Guided inquiry in chemistry: Teaching assistant training courses for undergraduates

Author: Sally Hunnicutt, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 10:35 AM10:55 AM

Room: MAK A1117

Related Symposium: S24

“Guided Inquiry in Chemistry” is a teaching assistant training course that introduces undergraduate students to the principles of guided inquiry, active learning, and collaborative learning in chemistry through practical, hands-on class work, discussions, and readings. Students in the course facilitate recitation sections using guided-inquiry, group-based activities. In addition, each student develops a guided inquiry activity on an assigned general chemistry topic and presents it orally to the class. Upon successful completion of this course, students may take the subsequent course “Chemistry Preceptorship,” continuing as teaching assistants for both laboratory and lecture courses. A primary objective of both courses is that students begin to reflect on how they learn. We will present examples of student reflections on teaching and learning.