P974: Implementing ANA-POGIL activities in a variety of analytical chemistry courses

Author: Caryl Fish, Saint Vincent College, USA

Co-Author: Mary Walczak, St. Olaf College, USA; Juliette Lantz, Drew University, USA; Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA

Date: 8/7/14

Time: 9:55 AM10:15 AM

Room: MAN 107

Related Symposium: S60

The ANA-POGIL project was conceived to bring the advantages of POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) to analytical chemistry. Thirty-six ANA-POGIL activities have been developed, reviewed, and classroom tested. They have been used in a variety of settings – from small liberal arts colleges to large state universities. Many of the courses were traditional analytical classes such as Quantitative Analysis and Instrumental Analysis. However, the activities were written to be flexible, since analytical concepts are taught in many different classes. They have also been successfully implemented in environmental analysis, research methods, and biochemistry classes. This presentation will provide insight into successful implementation strategies for ANA-POGIL activities in a variety of courses. It will also examine specific implementation examples in Instrumental Analysis, and Methods of Environmental Analysis.

P980: How instructors influence the development of scientific arguments in POGIL classrooms

Author: Courtney Stanford, University of Iowa, USA

Co-Author: Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA; Marcy Towns and Alena Moon, Purdue University, USA

Date: 8/7/14

Time: 10:15 AM10:35 AM

Room: MAK A1165

Related Symposium: S68

POGIL centered classrooms are designed to help students learn chemistry while encouraging the development of process skills such as communication, critical thinking, and assessment. The POGIL materials guide the students though the chemistry concepts, but the facilitation can significantly influence the development of processes skills. To investigate the importance of facilitation, four POGIL classrooms were studied using the Toulmin Analysis and the Inquiry Oriented Discursive Moves frameworks. Analysis focused on two different instructors at different schools, both of whom used the POGIL curriculum in their Physical Chemistry courses. Data was collected by recording the small group and whole class conversations and interactions taking place in the POGIL classroom. Initial analysis of an individual instructor’s implementation of the POGIL curriculum provided data regarding the nature of small group and whole class interactions, and the nature and quality of student generated arguments. This analysis was used to provide formative feedback to the instructor as to how well the observed behaviors and arguments aligned with their desired learning goals. The instructor was then able to make modifications to the facilitation of their course for the next iteration of the course. Data was collected for this subsequent implementation, and the two sets of implementations were compared. It was found that slight changes in how a POGIL classroom is facilitated can lead to significant differences in the types of student interactions and the nature of students’ arguments.

P983: Use of argumentation to investigate students’ chemical thinking

Author: Alena Moon, Purdue University, USA

Co-Author: Marcy Towns, Purdue University, USA; Courtney Stanford and Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA

Date: 8/7/14

Time: 11:30 AM11:50 AM

Room: MAK A1165

Related Symposium: S68

Engaging in argumentation that requires students to build concepts and defend them is an effective way of developing scientific reasoning skills in students. The POGIL physical chemistry curriculum serves as a platform for providing these argumentation opportunities in the classroom. This research aims to understand and evaluate students’ arguing skills and their chemical thinking as is demonstrated through such argumentation practices. Small groups and whole class interactions over the course of two months were videotaped and transcribed. These transcriptions will be analyzed and coded according to Toulmin’s model of argumentation, a model that identifies components of arguments. Further analysis characterized students’ chemical thinking by using a learning progression on chemical thinking developed by Sevian and Talanquer (2014). For six crosscutting chemical concepts, this learning progression describes five levels of thinking ranging from descriptive (lower bound) to multicomponent (upper bound). The results from this study identify how students’ chemical thinking progresses over the course of two months, compare the level of thinking represented in small groups and whole class discussions, and determine if explicitly teaching argumentation effectively promotes multi-component thinking.

P973: ANA-POGIL: The development and products of this innovative approach to teaching analytical chemistry

Author: Mary Walczak, St. Olaf College, USA

Co-Author: Caryl Fish, St. Vincent College, USA; Juliette Lantz, Drew University, USA; Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA

Date: 8/7/14

Time: 9:35 AM9:55 AM

Room: MAN 107

Related Symposium: S60

The ANAPOGIL consortium has developed a collection of 38 process oriented guided inquiry learning activities for teaching analytical concepts in Quantitative Analysis, Instrumental Analysis and other analytically-focused courses. This six-year NSF-funded project was implemented by a consortium of analytical chemistry and chemistry education faculty from a variety of different types of institutions. The materials were peer-reviewed and classroom tested and are commercially available. A variety of assessment data was collected at several institutions regarding the efficacy of the materials in developing content mastery and process skills, and student attitudes. In this talk we will highlight innovative aspects of the POGIL active learning pedagogy in the classroom, materials developed, assessment outcomes and the consortial approach.

P502: Assessing students’ process skills: Designing a rubric to provide feedback to students and faculty about problem solving skills

Author: Jennifer Schmidt, University of Iowa, USA

Co-Author: Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA; Julie Lantz, Drew University, USA; Chris Bauer, University of New Hampshire, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 10:35 AM10:55 AM

Room: MAK A1111

Related Symposium: S45

Process skills are strategies which students can use not only while working though chemistry problems but these skills can find broader applicability in other areas of their studies. One of the key process skills in chemistry is problem solving. Students’ solutions to problems are often evaluated on the correctness of their final answer, not on the steps taken to achieve the answer. In many instances, the problem solving process was done using logical steps but the final answer may not have been entirely correct, or a correct answer may have been reached with flawed reasoning or inefficient processes. The ANAPOGIL curriculum was designed not only to enhance student learning about core concepts in analytical chemistry but also to enrich students’ process skills, including problem solving. A rubric to assess students’ problem solving skills was developed based on the literature regarding what characteristics define a successful problem solver. Multiple iterations of the rubric were developed and refined based on an analysis of ANAPOGIL students’ responses to specially designed exam questions, lab reports, and usability studies with POGIL instructors. The problem solving rubric was designed as a tool for instructors to use to evaluate students’ problem solving processes. In return, the students will be provided with feedback on their problem solving skills, which goes beyond the correctness of the final answer. The rubric will find the most practical applications in a homework or laboratory environment.

P495: Impact of technology infused classrooms on teacher behaviors and practices

Author: Chamathca Priyanwada Kuda-Malwathumullage, The University of Iowa, USA

Co-Author: Renee Cole and Soonhye Park, The University of Iowa, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 10:35 AM10:55 AM

Room: MAK B1110

Related Symposium: S44

Teachers in a modern age cannot detach themselves from technology as it is tightly woven to the social and cultural background they live in. While several studies have been conducted to assess student learning gains in technology infused classrooms, work done to document the performance of college teachers in technology infused classrooms is limited. The purpose of our study was to document how college teachers develop their knowledge base by assessing (1) teachers’ ability to incorporate different types of technologies available in technology infused classrooms, (2) the influence of available technologies towards teacher behaviors and practices, and (3) teachers’ perception of technology use (technical tool vs. pedagogical tool) in their classrooms. According to the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge framework (TPCK), teachers’ knowledge consists of three bodies; content, pedagogy, and technology. Meaningful integration of these three bodies represents the development of a teacher knowledge base. Participants of this study included four faculty members who conducted their courses in a TILE (Transform-Interact-Learn-Engage) classroom, which is a technology infused learning space based on the SCALE-UP model. Participants’ teaching behaviors and practices were observed during the TILE classroom activities and the types of technologies used during these activities were also recorded. A semi-structured interview was conducted with each faculty member to further examine their experiences in using technology in their classrooms.

P421: Student-centered instruction and the assessment of process skills: The evaluation of student work

Author: Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA

Co-Author: Chris Bauer, University of New Hampshire, USA; Caryl Fish, St. Vincent College, USA; Juliette Lantz, Drew University, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 10:15 AM10:35 AM

Room: MAN 122

Related Symposium: S15

Many faculty and departments have identified process skills such as information processing, problem solving, and critical thinking as desired outcomes of their courses/programs of study. There have been significant shifts by many instructors to incorporate more active-learning approaches such as POGIL into their classes to more explicitly address the development of these skills. Despite these shifts, in many cases there remains a disconnect between assessment strategies and the goals of instruction. In order to address this issue, we have identified strategies that can be used to assess student outcomes for process skills in addition to content knowledge, and to provide students with meaningful feedback of their process skill development. Data collected for the ANAPOGIL project will be used to illustrate how these strategies can provide evidence of student learning and skill development.

P278: Increasing the impact of STEM education projects

Author: Courtney Stanford, University of Iowa, USA

Co-Author: Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA; Jeff Froyd - Texas A&M University, USA; Charles Henderson and Raina Khatri, Western Michigan University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 3:05 PM3:25 PM

Room: LTT 103

Related Symposium: S13

Increasing sustained adaptation and adoption of promising instructional strategies, programs, and materials has been identified as a critical component in efforts to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. The goal of this project is to support education developers in creating more effective propagation plans. These resources were developed based on the change literature, analysis of funded proposals, and by interviewing NSF program officers and STEM PIs with a range of education backgrounds and experience. The resources are designed to support education developers to consider propagation from the beginning of and throughout their project by considering three key aspects propagation: interactive development, interactive dissemination, and interactive support. Specific resources include 1) key questions PIs should consider when designing a project, 2) a list of specific activities to incorporate into a propagation plan, and 3) a rubric that can be used to evaluate proposals. This presentation will focus on the background, key findings, and implications for the chemistry education research community.

P143: Enhancing advanced analytical chemistry students’ laboratory experience in a round-robin style course using pre-laboratory videos and quizzes

Author: Jennifer Schmidt, University of Iowa, USA

Co-Author: Renee Cole, Scott Shaw and Ellie Keuter, University of Iowa, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 9:35 AM9:55 AM

Room: MAN 123

Related Symposium: S8

Well-designed laboratories help students develop skills in experimental design, data analysis, scientific argumentation, and communication, in addition to critical technical skills. Many upper level chemistry laboratory courses utilize an approach where students perform experiments in a round robin style, with each group of students working on one instrument per week, resulting in several different experiments being run during each laboratory period. One of the challenges generated by this approach is that students are presented with all of the pre-laboratory lectures at the beginning of the semester. This approach is not ideal as it creates situations where there are significant time lapses between when students learn about the background of the experiments and when they actually conduct the experiments in the laboratory. Pre-laboratory videos were generated for an advanced analytical laboratory based on baseline data gathered through observing students perform the laboratory experiments and through student interviews during a traditional course format. Three videos were created for each experiment. The first video focuses on the content and theory behind the experiment, the second demonstrates the technical aspects of the instruments, and the third focuses on approaches to data analysis. In order to demonstrate student understanding of the videos, pre-laboratory quizzes were generated to assess student comprehension of the video material and to ensure students are prepared to be successful in the laboratory. We will share our lessons learned in this development process and insights from initial implementations in the physical chemistry laboratory.

P104: Using process-oriented guided-inquiry active learning in analytical chemistry: The ANA-POGIL project

Author: Juliette Lantz, Drew University, USA

Co-Author: Renee Cole, University of Iowa, USA

Date: 8/3/14

Time: 2:05 PM2:25 PM

Room: MAK B1100

Related Symposium: S16

A consortium of analytical faculty members who are involved in curriculum development and chemistry education research have developed instructional materials for analytical chemistry based on the well-established POGIL (process-oriented guided inquiry learning) model (www.pogil.org). In POGIL classrooms, students in learning teams actively engage with materials using carefully designed activities, facilitated by the instructor. By closely scrutinizing data, graphs, instrument schematics or other models, and answering guiding questions, students are led to generate their own conclusions and construct their own conceptual understanding of analytical chemical principles. This dynamic learning strategy develops student problem solving, critical thinking, teamwork, and communication skills in the context of six fundamental areas of analytical chemistry: spectrometry, separations, equilibrium, electrochemistry, statistics, and analytical tools. All activities were peer-reviewed and then classroom tested at a range of institutions, leading to robust classroom materials that are easily adoptable and transportable. Implementation strategies were also developed and utilized at a broad range of institutions. These ANA-POGIL activities, along with an instructor’s guide that includes implementation and assessment strategies, are now commercially available. The efficacy of these materials was assessed at numerous institutions, including an analysis of student content mastery, process skill development, and student attitudes. A description of these materials and assessment results will be presented.