P861: Electrochemistry in the advanced organic laboratory: Electron withdrawing groups in action

Author: Michelle Boucher, Utica College, USA

Co-Author: Curtis Pulliam, Utica College, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 4:00 PM4:20 PM

Room: MAK B1120

Related Symposium: S57

The first set of experiments of our advanced organic chemistry laboratory sequence is the synthesis of ferrocene, the subsequent acylation of ferrocene, and the complete characterization of both products. After making their compounds, students analyze their products using the traditional methods of FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, and GC-MS. Students can see the substituent effect of the acetal group on the ring in the shifts in both the 1H and 13C NMR. In addition to the typical organic chemistry characterization tools, students perform electrochemistry (Cyclic Voltammetry) experiments on both products to determine the oxidation potential of the iron centers. The shift of the oxidation wave to more a more positive potential seen in this set of experiments clearly indicates the carbonyl’s role as a deactivating group, and helps fill out the story of how an electron withdrawing group changes the system.

P750b: Everything’s more fun in color: Red cabbage pH lab

Author: Daniel Barr, Utica College, USA

Co-Author: Michelle Boucher and Alyssa Thomas, Utica College, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 10:05 AM10:15 AM

Room: MAK B1120

Related Symposium: S57

We’ve all done more than our fair share of pH labs, and nothing elicits groans from young students like titration experiments. Sometimes we get to use indicators, which is nice because it brings some color to the endpoint of the experiment. In this presentation, I will talk about our use of red cabbage dye as a colorful pH indicator for the entire pH range. Not only does it provide a useful standard for determining the pH of a solution, the cabbage dye actually changes color during a titration experiment so students can clearly visualize what’s going on.

P490: Using a chemist’s tools: Instrumentation in a non-majors course

Author: Alyssa C. Thomas and Michelle Boucher, Utica College, USA

Co-Author: Curtis Pulliam, Utica College, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 10:35 AM10:55 AM

Room: MAK A1161

Related Symposium: S43

In our general chemistry laboratories, students use multiple types of instrumentation to study molecules “like a chemist” early on in their college careers. In our experience, students understand the chemistry better when they are able to investigate, analyze, and visualize molecules the way that chemists do. Before the development of this course, our only non-majors survey course was a traditional “Chemistry in Society” offering without a laboratory component. This was a troubling omission in our department, since we felt that students would benefit from our general chemistry worldview no matter what their major. We designed a new course to focus on instrumentation and laboratory work with lectures that were used to clarify and augment concepts first introduced in the experiments. The laboratory work, and thus instrumentation, was at the heart of the course. Building off of the philosophies of our general chemistry laboratories, we designed the laboratories around instrumentation use. Regardless of their majors, in this course they acted “like chemists” and had the chance to explore the world at the molecular level using the tools that chemists use.