P61: Understanding how students differentiate between their conceptual understanding of chemistry topics and their problem solving abilities around those topics

Author: Teresa Mead, South Dakota State University, USA

Co-Author: Michael Dianovsky, South Dakota State University, USA

Date: 8/3/14

Time: 4:00 PM4:20 PM

Room: MAN 107

Related Symposium: S9

Researchers define metacognition as awareness of and reflection upon one’s own cognitive process, which can induce self-regulation and conscious coordination of learning tasks. This study investigates students’ metacognitive awareness around both their conceptual understanding of chemistry topics and their problem solving abilities in a general chemistry class. Students were asked to discuss what it means to conceptual understand the chemistry topics they learned throughout the course. They were also asked to rate their conceptual understanding of these topics as well as their ability to solve problems related to these concepts. These ratings occurred three times throughout the semester: after each chapter, before each hourly exam, and before the final exam. This study will present an analysis of what it means for a student to conceptually understand chemistry topics, as well as how students connect their conceptual understanding of chemistry topics to their problem solving abilities.

P58: Students’ metacognitive skills in a general chemistry course: What are they and how do they change?

Author: Michael Dianovsky, South Dakota State University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/3/14

Time: 2:45 PM3:05 PM

Room: MAN 107

Related Symposium: S9

Metacognitive skills pertain to the acquired ability to plan, monitor, and evaluate one’s learning and problem-solving behavior. There is some consensus of what learning activities are typical for metacognitive skills. However, these skills are typically evaluated during a specific task in chemistry education, problem-solving. Much is still not known about how students plan, monitor, and evaluate their chemistry understanding outside of the classroom. This study investigates the skills students’ use to plan, monitor, and evaluate their knowledge throughout the semester of a general chemistry II course. In this course students submitted a series of reflections that asked them to discuss the skills they used to plan, monitor, and evaluate the content they were learning. In addition, students were asked to discuss if the strategies they were using were good strategies. The study will present an analysis of how students’ metacognitive skills change throughout the course of the semester, and the reasons students made such changes.