P1035: First-Year Seminar: Preparing undergraduate students for a liberal-arts education using science and art

Author: Deanna O’Donnell, Hamline University

Co-Author:

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 12:10 PM12:30 PM

At Hamline University all incoming students are required to take a first-year seminar (FYSEM), which are interdisciplinary courses aimed at preparing students for college. Topics vary but the general curricular structure of a FYSEM helps students develop communication and research skills. In the Science and Art FYSEM, students with a variety of intended majors explored the role of physics, biology, and largely chemistry in the creation, degradation, and conservation of art objects. Over half of the students were STEM student concurrently enrolled in General Chemistry. These STEM students expressed a greater understanding of chemistry due to the applications explored in this FYSEM. This course brought students into the laboratory to create and study art, which provided laboratory exposure for non-STEM students through a familiar subject. Content ranged from color and light, dyes and textiles, pigments and paints, frescos, metal art, and scientific examination of art. Student made paint with a pigment they synthesized and then studied that paint using modern instrumentation. Using the science and art content as a foundation, skills were developed through written and oral assignments. Oral communication skills were honed through classroom presentations and unique activities such as a class debate on the use of digital versus film in the cinematic arts. Assessment of these skills used rubrics developed at Hamline for use across disciplines and at all levels of study. The culmination of the course was an exhibition open to the campus where students presented their research projects on the aforementioned subjects.

P874: Building information literacy in first-year chemistry students through student-centered learning and experimental design

Author: Margaret Bruehl, University of Colorado Denver, USA

Co-Author: Denise Pan and Ignacio Ferrer-Vinent, University of Colorado Denver, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 2:25 PM2:45 PM

Room: MAK B1112

Related Symposium: S61

This presentation describes two curriculum modules developed for first-year general chemistry laboratory courses which introduce the scientific literature and creative experiment design to build information literacy and support a student-centered learning environment. The intention of these curriculum units is to expose a population of general chemistry students to the scientific literature and its role in experimental design and scientific discovery. By introducing literature search resources available from our campus library and the internet, we establish a level of information literacy in these beginning science students which supports their development of reasoning and critical thinking abilities. Activities in the modules are mapped to the core competencies of information literacy and the student-centered learning environment where the student is an active participant in his or her own learning. The modules were delivered in a three-year case study of honors chemistry students at the University of Colorado Denver. Initial findings from a longitudinal survey of student self-assessed attitudes and beliefs suggest that introducing the scientific literature and information literacy skills in first-year chemistry courses provide immediate and long-term benefits to student performance and engagement in the sciences.

P709: Qualitative/quantitative analysis of artificial food dyes: A UV/VIS course-embedded research experience for Principles of Chemistry at Georgia Gwinnett College

Author: Ian H. Krouse, Georgia Gwinnett College, USA

Co-Author: Simon M. Mwongela, Greta Giles, Michael S. Morton, Sang H. Park and Benjamin C. Shepler, Georgia Gwinnett College, USA; Deborah G. Sauder, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 10:15 AM10:35 AM

Room: LMH 114

Related Symposium: S51

As part of the USG-STEM Initiative II, the School of Science and Technology (SST) at Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) was selected for a grant to integrate course-embedded undergraduate research experience (URE). Two mini-grants were approved for the implementation of research projects within the Principles of Chemistry I &II courses. Principles of Chemistry I &II are very important SST courses as the vast majority of B.S. degrees granted at GGC require both of these chemistry courses. The two research experiences in the different semesters are connected and based upon the theme of spectrophotometric identification of food dyes. Although determination of food dyes in various foods types has been discussed in great length throughout the scientific literature the novelty of this research activity is that these analyses have not been conducted at the institution-wide scale akin to the GGC URE.

P710: Solid-supported azo dye arrays in the development of a colorimetric anion-selective indicator

Author: Noel M. Paul, The Ohio State University, USA

Co-Author: Benjamin P. Mohr, J. Clay Harris and Chris S. Callam, The Ohio State University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 10:35 AM10:55 AM

Room: LMH 114

Related Symposium: S51

Sophomore organic chemistry students have collaborated in the search for an azo dye that elicits a unique ionochromic effect in the presence of specific anions. As a complement to existing methods, colorimetric anion-selective indictors hold promise as a method to quickly quantitate threshold levels of toxic anions in both remote and economically depressed regions where analytical instrumentation is out of reach. Although this effect was previously identified through a screen of commercially available dyes, synthetic challenges have impeded the investigation of a related series of dyes whose aim is to elaborate the mechanism of this selective color change effect. Students functionalized cellulose chromatography paper with the assistance of microwave radiation, then conducted unique azo-coupling reactions following a specific grid pattern to yield 42 unique arrays. Each dye array was separated into three identical test strips, and these strips were subsequently exposed to acid, nitrate, or bromide. Using diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy, 630 full spectra were collected and the resulting data was complied and returned to the students for analysis. These results have suggested new single-molecule targets for future investigation. Following the study, the massive data set was processed using principal component analysis to reveal correlations difficult to detect through graphical means. Through their participation in this project, students earned insight into the difficulties and rewards inherit in the development of new knowledge, and using their results, this solid phase approach has been confirmed as an effective method to screen a large number of candidates for the development of anion-selective indicators.

P552: Establishing the absolute configuration of chiral secondary alcohols using the Competing Enantioselective Conversion (CEC) method: Visualizing enantioselectivity using thin-layer chromatography

Author: Shawn M. Miller, University of California Ð Irvine, USA

Co-Author: Alexander J. Wagner, Steven Nguyen, Ga Young Lee, Scott D. Rychnovsky and Rene D. Link, University of California Ð Irvine, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 3:05 PM3:25 PM

Room: ASH 2302

Related Symposium: S23

Effective methods to demonstrate the importance of chirality in an undergraduate laboratory setting are hindered by the difficulty of experimentally differentiating enantiomers of a compound with easily accessible resources. We report an experiment to establish the absolute configuration of enantioenriched secondary alcohols by comparing two reactions, each containing a pair of chiral molecules, using the Competing Enantioselective Conversion (CEC) method (1). An enantioenriched chiral secondary alcohol is reacted with each enantiomer of a chiral acylating agent in separate reactions. These two reactions result in one case where the secondary alcohol is “matched” with one enantiomer of the chiral acylating reagent, producing a fast reaction, and one case where the same alcohol is “mismatched” with the other enantiomer of the chiral acylating reagent, producing a slower reaction over the same time period. These different rates are visualized via thin-layer chromatography (TLC). By identifying the faster reaction, the absolute configuration of the starting alcohol is assigned via a mnemonic. The experiment has been conducted with over 1,000 students (2). This laboratory experiment is simple to execute at both small and large schools, with commercially available reagents and materials. (1) Wagner, A. J.; Rychnovsky, S. D. J. Org. Chem. 2013, 78, 4594−4598. (2) Wagner, A. J.; Miller, S. M.; Nguyen, S.; Lee, G. Y.; Rychnovsky, S. D.; Link, R. D. J. Chem. Educ., in press.

P320: Powering the planet: Exploring renewable energy in an interdisciplinary first-year seminar

Author: Kari Young, Centre College, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 2:05 PM2:25 PM

Room: MAK A1165

Related Symposium: S26

In a first-year studies course at Centre College, students investigated conventional and alternative energy technologies for providing electricity to Earth’s seven billion people. Class meeting time during the three-week January term was divided into modules devoted to a particular technology: nuclear power, wind power, hydroelectricity, biomass, and solar power. Students delivered oral presentations explaining the operational principles behind each of the major fossil fuel alternatives, using elements of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. Back-of-the-envelope calculations were used to estimate the global capacity, land use requirements, and cost to power the planet using each fossil fuel alternative. Hands-on activities were performed in groups and included wind turbine design, synthesis of biodiesel from waste fryer oil, and assembly of dye-sensitized solar cells. The course culminated in an independent proposal for powering a chosen geographic unit with consideration of land use and resource availability. Overall, students reported that this course expanded their thinking on about a topic of global impact that crosses disciplinary barriers.

P295: Year one of a flipped organic chemistry course

[WITHDRAWN]

Author: Aaron Moehlig, Adams State University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 4:20 PM4:40 PM

Room: LTT 101

Related Symposium: S21

In an attempt to provide students with a more complete understanding of organic chemistry a flipped pedagogy was implemented in a small daily lecture course over the past year. During the first semester of the course, students were required to produce notes, outside of class, from their textbook (David Klein’s Organic Chemistry, first edition), complete instructor designed problem sets during class, and respond to online surveys covering the material discussed in each chapter of the textbook. The online surveys provided the instructor with feedback concerning what students were struggling to understand and allowed for a lecture to be designed to specifically focus on these areas. During the second semester of the course much of the same course framework was employed, with a few minor changes. Specifically, students were no longer required to turn in their notes from the textbook and the online surveys took on a more complex form intended to give students practice writing about organic chemistry principles and concepts in a manner that would be too time intensive to be used as examination questions. Examples of problem sets, surveys, and a discussion of how students responded to and performed in this course will be discussed.

P234: Science based approaches to the first-year liberal arts seminar course [WITHDRAWN]

Author: Jay Wackerly, Central College, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 10:35 AM10:55 AM

Room: MAK B1112

Related Symposium: S27

The focus of this symposium is on bringing the liberal arts into the chemistry classroom; in this talk I will flip this idea and focus on how I incorporate science and scientific thinking into a liberal arts course. First, I will describe how our first year liberal arts seminar is run at Central College (small, residential, liberal arts college). I will then discuss specific approaches, strategies, and discussion topics I have used in this course previously. Finally, I will outline some new ideas that I have for the upcoming academic year.

P224: Science One: An interdisciplinary first-year science program

Author: Chris Addison, The University of British Columbia, Canada

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 9:35 AM9:55 AM

Room: MAK A1165

Related Symposium: S26

Science One is an interdisciplinary first-year science program offered to 75 students each year at the University of British Columbia. In its twentieth year, Science One provides an integrated educational experience encompassing first-year biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics by emphasizing the connections between the disciplines. Teaching in an integrated format presents many logistical challenges due to the fact that each discipline often has it’s own preference for the order that content should be presented. Furthermore, one must also be careful to ensure consistency in nomenclature and in descriptions of phenomena that span multiple disciplines. This compels members of the Science One teaching team to view content as a whole and break out of their disciplinary norms. In this presentation I will discuss current efforts in Science One to provide an integrated curriculum for topics common to the four first-year disciplines, and will provide examples of teaching themes used in our classroom. I will also discuss current efforts to measure the benefits this experience provides to students in our program.

P195: Advantages and disadvantages of flipping the general chemistry classroom: A three year study

Author: Dominick Casadonte, Texas Tech University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 11:50 AM12:10 PM

Room: LTT 101

Related Symposium: S21

We have been involved in flipping classes in both on-line and face-to-face formats since 2008. In this study, have time-shifted” or “flipped” the Honors General Chemistry course sequence at Texas Tech University during the 2011-12 and 2012-2013 academic years. All of the lectures were pre-recorded using the Mediasite platform and placed on Blackboard for students to watch in advance of class time. Online web learning homework assignments were used to determine if students had watched the lecture. Class time was used to summarize lectures, clear up muddy conceptual points, and work advanced problems, using a variety of modalities. The efficacy of the method was determined by giving exams that had been given to other honors classes (> 5 years previously) and comparing exam results, as well as through standardized ACS content exams. A 40-question Likert assessment and a 40-question free-response assessment were also given to the students in a pre-post format. Results of the various assessments, as well as the effectiveness of the method for different student cohorts will be discussed.