P933: Incorporating inquiry experiments and activities to develop conceptual understanding of biochemistry

Author: Chloe House, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Kimberly Linenberger and Glen Meades, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 5:15 PM6:30 PM

Room: LIB

Related Symposium: S33

The purpose of this study is to implement laboratory experiments that strengthen students’ knowledge about biochemistry. At present, there are no biochemistry experiments in the Introduction to organic and biochemistry laboratory. Therefore, a series of experiments were developed and implemented into the course during the spring 2014 semester. Results from pre- and post-assessments, student responses to questions during the experiment, and comments on the implementation of the experiment will be presented. In addition, suggestions for future implementation will be discussed based on the findings of the study.

P943: Impact of molecular complexity on student performance

Author: Zachary Farley, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 5:15 PM6:30 PM

Room: LIB

Related Symposium: S33

Determining R/S isomer configuration is a canonical task in organic chemistry classes. However, little information is known about how the molecules professors choose to put on assessments impact students’ ability to interpret molecules and assigning R/S configurations. By giving 1st semester organic chemistry students an online survey we obtained the response time, mental effort and accuracy of the answer. The survey contained 12 structures where students had to assign R/S configuration. The data collected was used to calculate the efficiency of each structure in aiding students in correctly assigning R/S configuration. The discussion will include the efficiency of each structure and how structures that are shown on assessments impact students’ performance.

P479: One in-depth look of visual aids represented in general, organic, and biochemistry textbooks [WITHDRAWN]

Author: Ariele Edwards, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 12:10 PM12:30 PM

Room: LOH 164

Related Symposium: S41

There are many tools utilized in chemistry education. The most universal tool being a textbook. The text and the various depictions aid in the comprehension of chemistry concepts. Our goal is to review and evaluate the illustrations of the most current edition of General, Organic, and Biochemistry (GOB) textbooks used in 1 semester and/or 2 semester courses. Each representation is classified into one or more defined categories. Analysis of the collected data will determine which type of representations occur most frequently for each topic within the GOB textbooks. The types of practice problems in the textbooks will also be assessed to better understand how students are expected to demonstrate what they have learned. This will help us get a better comprehension of what students recognize in GOB chemistry classes and on examinations.

P449: Improving biochemistry students’ understanding of enzyme-substrate interactions

Author: Ellen Humphreys, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 9:55 AM10:15 AM

Room: HON 148

Related Symposium: S37

Previous research has indicated that biochemistry students have a particularly difficult time with enzyme-substrate interactions and the ESICI (with distracters based on previously discovered incorrect ideas) has been developed to determine the most common misconceptions in relation to this topic. Using the concept inventory, misconceptions were identified from a one semester biochemistry course and a suite of activities is under construction for use in the classroom as a replacement for the traditional lecture-based method of teaching. This suite of activities will help students to better incorporate enzyme-substrate interactions into their long-term memory as well as giving students the chance to discuss their idea with fellow students. Student interviews and ESICI data from a pilot test of the activities will be presented to determine if more students’ misconceptions are corrected through use of the suite of activities than through traditional teaching methods.

P277: Is chemistry education research truly reaching the masses?

Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 2:45 PM3:05 PM

Room: LTT 103

Related Symposium: S13

Several articles in recent years have investigated who are publishing Chemistry Education Research, how often these studies are published, in what journals they are being published, and what areas of research are being focused on. However, with a current focus on how CER is impacting the teaching and learning of chemistry, no study to date has investigated who is actually citing the Chemistry Education Research and how the research is being used in the literature. A forward citation search was conducted on CER articles from Journal of Chemical Education, Chemistry Education Research and Practice, The Chemical Educator, and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education between 2003 and 2013. Findings from the study including the diversity of citation locations and most prevalent types of articles cited will be discussed. This analysis will aid the CER community in assessing the importance of these articles and how they have shaped subsequent research and scholarship.

P217: What were they thinking when they drew that?

Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Michelle Dean, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 9:55 AM10:15 AM

Room: LOH 164

Related Symposium: S25

Pen and pencil technology has been recently introduced as a new research tool that allows researchers to easily keep track of what students’ say as they are drawing with the pen. This not only helps address research questions but also allows for similar insights in the classroom. We used the technology in a chemistry course for current science teachers in other disciplines. The presentation will focus on how this technology allowed us to see how the teachers were describing the models that they would use to teach various chemistry concepts and what areas the teachers still needed support. Implications for future implementations will also be discussed.

P124: STEM concept inventories: Analysis of what’s out there

Author: Ellen Humphreys, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 9:35 AM9:55 AM

Room: HON 148

Related Symposium: S4

Concept inventories have been used for testing in many fields, including psychology and chemistry. The development of STEM concept inventories is a fairly recent event, and as such, there are many different ways to develop these concept inventories. At the moment, there is not a central resource for all of the concept inventories that have been published. This prevents users from comparing and contrasting the different concept inventories that could be used for their specific purposes. A review of STEM concept inventories published in peer-reviewed journals was conducted. Findings related to the range of concepts covered, methods of item development, and psychometrics of both items and overall inventory will be discussed.