P921: Relationship between math and chemistry

Author: Margaret Neiman, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Co-Author: Katie E. Amaral, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 5:15 PM6:30 PM

Room: LIB

Related Symposium: S33

At Pennsylvania State University there is a prerequisite of the second semester of college algebra (algebra II) in order to take general chemistry I. This project compares algebra II and general chemistry I grades of the students who have taken both courses to the students that were already proficient in math (i.e. did not require algebra II). Through scrutinizing student grades, attempts at these courses and withdrawals from these courses, comparisons will be made to establish any correlations between the aforementioned groups. The grades of students who have taken algebra II and general chemistry I will be accumulated and examined and compared to students who started with calculus I. The collected data will be analyzed using differing statistical methods, including Kruskal-Wallis analyses of variances, ANOVAs, ANCOVAs, and other tests as appropriate.

P671: First look at accelerated chemistry

Author: Katie E. Amaral, Penn State Berks, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 10:15 AM10:35 AM

Room: LTT 103

Related Symposium: S13

A branch campus decided to work within the traditional semester to offer courses in an accelerated format to increases opportunities for students to complete or to catch up on their work. The courses chosen for acceleration were organic chemistry I and II and general chemistry I and II. In one semester, a student could take general chemistry I in 7 weeks, take the final exam, then take general chemistry II in the remaining 7 weeks, followed by the final. In the subsequent semester, a student could take organic chemistry I in the first 7 weeks of the semester, take the final exam, then take organic chemistry II, followed by the final. In one academic year, a student could have taken two traditional years’ worth of courses. This study examines the outcomes of this pilot program for a variety of factors, including student satisfaction, student outcomes (including grades and withdrawals) and student retention into other chemistry courses. It is important to note that these accelerated courses covered the exact same material as the traditional semester-long chemistry classes.

P523: Clickers work

Author: Sabrina V. Giorgio, Penn State Berks, USA

Co-Author: Katie E. Amaral, Penn State Berks, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 3:40 PM4:00 PM

Room: LTT 103

Related Symposium: S13

A redesign of General Chemistry I (Chem 110) at Penn State Berks included the implementation of peer mentors, online quizzes, pre-class assignments, and most importantly a student response system with corresponding questions related to each lecture. This study reports the effects of the student response system on student outcomes before and after it was implemented into the course design. The data revealed that students who used the student response system in Chem 110 compared to students that did not previously use clickers improved their grade at their first attempt at the class from a 1.64 to 2.38 on the GPA scale, while withdrawals decreased from 0.30 to 0.08. Other significant differences such as average and high grades as well as attempts were found in this study. The same analyses were performed on General Chemistry II, Organic Chemistry I, and Organic Chemistry II students, as well as the effects of the student response system on outcomes by student gender in each class.