P883: Chemtertainment: More fun in teaching and learning Chemistry

Author: Elmer-Rico E. Mojica, Pace University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 3:05 PM3:25 PM

Room: MAN 102

Related Symposium: S62

Most people obtained their knowledge and understanding of science not from school but from pop culture like television, movies and popular novels. The advent of the series Crime Scene Investigation and its spin-offs results in the popularity of forensic science hence raising the scientific awareness for the audience. Promoting chemistry or science as a whole is a weak point of the present educational system in our country. Using movies as examples to illustrate concepts in chemistry heightens the students’ interests. They find it amusing and entertaining making learning more fun. This presentation provides references to different chemical concepts that have been directly or indirectly discussed in several movies. These include some classic movies like ‘It’s A Wonderful Life’ as well as contemporary movies like ‘The Amazing Spiderman’.

P820: Experiences in mentoring undergraduate students in different types of colleges and universities

Author: Elmer-Rico E. Mojica, Pace University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 3:40 PM4:00 PM

Room: LMH 114

Related Symposium: S51

One innovative strategy that can improve higher education is the engagement of undergraduate students in doing research. Mentoring is one of the few opportunities that afford extended face-to-face and one-on-one instruction. However, mentoring undergraduate students in doing research is not the same in different types of colleges and universities. This paper gives insights on my experience on how undergraduate students are being mentored in different school settings namely: a third world country premier university, a big research public university, a small historically black college and a private university. The advantages and disadvantages of each setting will be discussed and emphasis will be given on how the presenter engages his students to do research in a private university.