P449: Improving biochemistry students’ understanding of enzyme-substrate interactions

Author: Ellen Humphreys, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 9:55 AM10:15 AM

Room: HON 148

Related Symposium: S37

Previous research has indicated that biochemistry students have a particularly difficult time with enzyme-substrate interactions and the ESICI (with distracters based on previously discovered incorrect ideas) has been developed to determine the most common misconceptions in relation to this topic. Using the concept inventory, misconceptions were identified from a one semester biochemistry course and a suite of activities is under construction for use in the classroom as a replacement for the traditional lecture-based method of teaching. This suite of activities will help students to better incorporate enzyme-substrate interactions into their long-term memory as well as giving students the chance to discuss their idea with fellow students. Student interviews and ESICI data from a pilot test of the activities will be presented to determine if more students’ misconceptions are corrected through use of the suite of activities than through traditional teaching methods.

P124: STEM concept inventories: Analysis of what’s out there

Author: Ellen Humphreys, Kennesaw State University, USA

Co-Author: Kimberly Linenberger, Kennesaw State University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 9:35 AM9:55 AM

Room: HON 148

Related Symposium: S4

Concept inventories have been used for testing in many fields, including psychology and chemistry. The development of STEM concept inventories is a fairly recent event, and as such, there are many different ways to develop these concept inventories. At the moment, there is not a central resource for all of the concept inventories that have been published. This prevents users from comparing and contrasting the different concept inventories that could be used for their specific purposes. A review of STEM concept inventories published in peer-reviewed journals was conducted. Findings related to the range of concepts covered, methods of item development, and psychometrics of both items and overall inventory will be discussed.