P811: General chemistry program assessment: What should we be teaching? What are students learning?

Author: Derek A. Behmke, Bradley University, USA

Co-Author: Dean J. Campbell and Christina Zibart, Bradley University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 3:05 PM3:25 PM

Room: ASH 2302

Related Symposium: S23

During the 2013-2014 academic year Bradley University completed a rigorous internal General Chemistry program assessment. The assessment utilized a mixed-methods approach. Qualitative measures included a survey of General Chemistry syllabi from numerous institutions to ascertain typical curriculum content, a survey of student opinions regarding the General Chemistry course sequence, and informal dialogue with course instructors. Quantitative measures included student homework and exam performance, student course grades, and Item Response Theory analysis of exams. All of these measures were aimed at answering two questions. What should we be teaching? What are students learning? Preliminary qualitative data show an overall positive opinion of the course sequence. Quantitative data point to several topics where further curricular changes may be necessary. A complete summary of the results of the program assessment will be presented.

P647: General chemistry program assessment: The role of online homework

Author: Christina Zibart, Bradley University, USA

Co-Author: Derek A. Behmke and Dean J. Campbell, Bradley University, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 5:15 PM6:30 PM

Room: LIB

Related Symposium: S33

During the 2013-2014 academic year Bradley University completed a rigorous internal general chemistry program assessment. The assessment used a mixed-methods approach that accounted for student and instructor opinions, and incorporated quantitative measures of student performance. One of the primary goals of the review was to assess the impact of the incorporation of online homework on student performance in the general chemistry program. Qualitative measures of the impact of online homework were limited to student surveys. Surveys indicate that students have a mixed opinion of the incorporation of online homework into the curriculum. Despite the mixed opinions of students, several important quantitative correlations, some involving the use of Item Response Theory, will be presented that indicate using online homework improves student learning in general chemistry.

P203: Addition of space-related demonstrations to chemistry outreach shows

Author: Dean J. Campbell, Bradley University, USA

Co-Author: Donald K. Schorr, Bradley University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 9:35 AM9:55 AM

Room: ASH 2302

Related Symposium: S23

The Bradley University Chemistry Club Demo Crew has been involved in at least 125 science outreach events since 2007 and reached out to over 10,000 participants. For the last two years, this group has received funding from the Illinois Space Grant Consortium, and as a result, some of the science demonstrations used by the Demo Crew have acquired an astronomy or aerospace theme. Themes that have been easily connected to “space” include: light emission by excited elements, gas-producing reactions, thermal insulation, metal- and carbon-based nanotechnology, and oxygen/hydrogen reactions. Project needs, such as time, student participants, and funding, will also be discussed.