P682: Student-centered learning using an integrative approach in an exploratory junior-level studio laboratory

Author: David R. Goode, Mercer University, USA

Co-Author: Caryn S. Seney and Dale E. Moore, Mercer University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 11:30 AM11:50 AM

Room: MAN 122

Related Symposium: S15

At Mercer University, we observed a skills gap in students beginning their senior-level original research projects. While these students were well prepared for most laboratory techniques, they often lacked necessary research process skills. In particular, they struggled with integrating concepts from courses and previous experiences and then applying them to their project. They also required growth in reading and applying relevant peer-reviewed literature to their research. Finally, development of the oral and written communication of a deeper understanding of their work was needed. To address these issues curricularly, we designed a collaborative in-depth junior-level studio laboratory that supplants the typical junior-level course laboratories. The course requires students (in cohorts) to design a project based upon a guiding publication supplied by the faculty-two semester long projects, four total per academic year. The assessment strategy and initial results after the first year of implementation will be discussed.

P253: Gamification of the organic synthesis project at Mercer University part I: Design and implementation

Author: Adam M. Kiefer, Mercer University, USA

Co-Author: David R. Goode, Mercer University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 4:00 PM4:20 PM

Room: LMH 176

Related Symposium: S3

In 2012, the organic chemistry faculty at Mercer University altered our longstanding Organic Synthesis Project (OSP) as a result of increased enrollment, increased costs and waste management, and safety concerns. In spite of these concerns we wanted to maintain a project that has students 1) search and read the primary literature, 2) write a proposal for a three-step reaction sequence based upon the primary literature, 3) attempt to carry out their proposed reaction sequence and 4) disseminate their findings to the class. In order to fulfill these objectives, the faculty gamified the laboratory experience with a zombie theme. This presentation highlights the development and implementation of this gamification strategy.

P254: Gamification of the organic synthesis project at Mercer University part II: Assessment and perceptions

Author: David R. Goode, Mercer University, USA

Co-Author: Adam M. Kiefer, Mercer University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 4:20 PM4:40 PM

Room: LMH 176

Related Symposium: S3

The gamification of the Organic Synthesis Project at Mercer University represented a significant change from previous iterations of the project. Student, faculty, and laboratory assistant perceptions of the project have been assessed. Preliminary results indicate that this experience has been beneficial for student learning and confidence in the laboratory. In addition, the faculty members have noticed a decrease in logistical work, which has allowed them to focus more time on student learning. The presentation will present the assessment strategy and results from the first two years of implementation.