P540: PUNK – the Polymer Undergraduate Network of Knowledge [WITHDRAWN]

Author: Sarah L. Goh, Williams College, USA

Co-Author: Katherine B. Aubrecht, Stony Brook University, USA; Erik B. Berda, University of New Hampshire, USA; Kevin A. Cavicchi, University of Akron, USA; Philip J. Costanzo, California Polytechnic State University Ð San Luis Obispo, USA; Gregory J. Gabriel, Kennesaw State University, USA; Christopher Goh, Williams College, USA; Scott T. Iacono, U.S. Air Force Academy, USA; Sarah E. Morgan and Daniel A. Savin, University of Southern Mississippi, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 4:20 PM4:40 PM

Room: LTT 102

Related Symposium: S17

Polymeric materials play an important role in our world, and the field of polymer science is of significance to industry. This poster introduces a new web portal: the “Polymer Undergraduate Network of Knowledge” (PUNK; PUNKpolymer.org). By making high quality learning materials freely-available the aim of PUNK is to encourage and facilitate the inclusion of polymer-related topics into foundational course units of general, inorganic, physical and organic chemistry and to create awareness of the crucial role of polymers. These resources will aid in providing our students with adequate training in polymer science at the undergraduate level. In addition, PUNK hopes to serve as a platform for discussions for presenting polymer-related topics to the various undergraduate constituencies. We envisage a virtual place to build community and share resources among faculty dedicated to bringing aspects of the chemistry, physics and engineering of polymers into courses at the undergraduate level. This talk will provide an overview of this web-portal and illustrate its uses and the materials currently available. Materials include lecture slides, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments in general areas such as relative sizes of macromolecules; biological and synthetic categories; methods of synthesis; physical properties; structure-property relationships; and the environmental impact of polymers. For instructors looking to initiate a polymer science course, we will have an array of syllabi, textbook options, and laboratory syllabi available for reference. In addition to the lecture and laboratory content described above, we will offer resources that assist with teaching scientific writing, including peer review strategies for the classroom.

P391: PUNK: The Polymer Undergraduate Network of Knowledge

Author: Christopher Goh, Williams College, USA

Co-Author: Katherine B. Aubrecht, Stony Brook University, USA; Erik B. Berda, University of New Hampshire, USA; Kevin A. Cavicchi, University of Akron, USA; Philip J. Costanzo, California Polytechnic State University Ð San Luis Obispo, USA; Gregory J. Gabriel, Kennesaw State University, USA; Sarah L. Goh, Williams College, USA; Scott T. Iacono, U.S. Air Force Academy, USA; Sarah E. Morgan, University of Southern Mississippi, USA; Daniel A. Savin, University of Southern Mississippi, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 6:00 PM7:15 PM

Room: KC

Related Symposium: S33

Polymeric materials play an important role in our world, and the field of polymer science is of significance to industry. This poster introduces a new web portal: the “Polymer Undergraduate Network of Knowledge” (PUNK; PUNKpolymer.org). By making high quality learning materials freely-available the aim of PUNK is to encourage and facilitate the inclusion of polymer-related topics into foundational course units of general, inorganic, physical, and organic chemistry and to create awareness of the crucial role of polymers. These resources will aid in providing our students with adequate training in polymer science at the undergraduate level. In addition, PUNK hopes to serve as a platform for discussions for presenting polymer-related topics to the various undergraduate constituencies. We envisage a virtual place to build community and share resources among faculty dedicated to bringing aspects of the chemistry, physics and engineering of polymers into courses at the undergraduate level. This poster will provide an overview of this web-portal and illustrate its uses and the materials currently available. Materials include lecture slides, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments in general areas such as relative sizes of macromolecules; biological and synthetic categories; methods of synthesis; physical properties; structure-property relationships; and the environmental impact of polymers. For instructors looking to initiate a polymer science course, we will have an array of syllabi, textbook options, and laboratory syllabi available for reference. In addition to lecture and laboratory content, we will offer resources that assist with teaching scientific writing, including peer review strategies for the classroom.