P811: General chemistry program assessment: What should we be teaching? What are students learning?

Author: Derek A. Behmke, Bradley University, USA

Co-Author: Dean J. Campbell and Christina Zibart, Bradley University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 3:05 PM3:25 PM

Room: ASH 2302

Related Symposium: S23

During the 2013-2014 academic year Bradley University completed a rigorous internal General Chemistry program assessment. The assessment utilized a mixed-methods approach. Qualitative measures included a survey of General Chemistry syllabi from numerous institutions to ascertain typical curriculum content, a survey of student opinions regarding the General Chemistry course sequence, and informal dialogue with course instructors. Quantitative measures included student homework and exam performance, student course grades, and Item Response Theory analysis of exams. All of these measures were aimed at answering two questions. What should we be teaching? What are students learning? Preliminary qualitative data show an overall positive opinion of the course sequence. Quantitative data point to several topics where further curricular changes may be necessary. A complete summary of the results of the program assessment will be presented.

P647: General chemistry program assessment: The role of online homework

Author: Christina Zibart, Bradley University, USA

Co-Author: Derek A. Behmke and Dean J. Campbell, Bradley University, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 5:15 PM6:30 PM

Room: LIB

Related Symposium: S33

During the 2013-2014 academic year Bradley University completed a rigorous internal general chemistry program assessment. The assessment used a mixed-methods approach that accounted for student and instructor opinions, and incorporated quantitative measures of student performance. One of the primary goals of the review was to assess the impact of the incorporation of online homework on student performance in the general chemistry program. Qualitative measures of the impact of online homework were limited to student surveys. Surveys indicate that students have a mixed opinion of the incorporation of online homework into the curriculum. Despite the mixed opinions of students, several important quantitative correlations, some involving the use of Item Response Theory, will be presented that indicate using online homework improves student learning in general chemistry.