P776: Designing a library research project to identify credible resources on climate change

Author: Charity Lovitt, Seattle University, USA

Co-Author: Kristen Shuyler, Seattle University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 11:10 AM11:30 AM

Room: MAK B1112

Related Symposium: S61

Students in an interdisciplinary course on climate change developed a training document that staff at a local science center could use to correct misconceptions about climate change. Documents created by students had two purposes; to educate staff on common climate change misconceptions and provide scientific evidence that enabled staff to address the misconception with visitors. A library activity was developed where students found popular sources exemplifying the misconceptions and scientific sources providing evidence related to the misconceptions. As part of the activity, students were required to evaluate the credibility of literature sources they found by determining if sources were written by an expert scientist, contained real scientific data, and were written for a scientific audience. The library activity prepared them to produce an annotated bibliography of articles which they then used to create their training document for science center staff.

P778: Wikipedia editing in chemistry classrooms: Learning chemistry and improving information competencies simultaneously

Author: Kristen Shuyler, Seattle University, USA

Co-Author: Ye Li and Anne McNeil, University of Michigan, USA; Charity Flener Lovitt, Seattle University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 11:50 AM12:10 PM

Room: MAK B1112

Related Symposium: S61

Class projects to edit Wikipedia articles on chemistry topics can be used to enhance student learning and understanding of course material as well as improve information literacy, peer review, communication and collaboration skills. Through these projects, students learn to select credible sources, evaluate information, address copyright issues, and communicate chemistry to the general public. Wikipedia projects are flexible enough to fit different levels of learning needs in universities. At Seattle University, we developed a 6-week-long Wikipedia editing activity for a freshman level interdisciplinary science course. At the University of Michigan, a 9-week-long project was used in a few graduate level organic chemistry classes. This talk will discuss the scaffold used to develop these activities, student responses to the activities and their output, and informal assessment of learning gains. We will compare the two projects, one for undergraduates and one for graduate students, to demonstrate the potential and flexibility of this action-based learning opportunity. We will also discuss how collaboration between course instructors and librarians can ensure the efficiency and effectiveness of the project.

P328: Reflection as a tool to identify misconceptions that hinder student learning

Author: Charity Lovitt, Seattle University, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 2:45 PM3:05 PM

Room: MAK B1112

Related Symposium: S27

A commonly used tool in liberal arts is reflection. Well designed reflections can improve problem-solving skills, integrative thinking, openness to new ideas, and the ability to adopt new perspectives. Reflection is important because students enter the chemistry classroom with their own values and misconceptions, some of which may hinder student learning. Instructors must actively seek out and encourage students to explicitly identify their misconceptions through reflective practices. Despite the benefits, science classes have been slow to incorporate reflection into their courses. This talk will show examples of how reflection was used in two different courses, an upper division interdisciplinary course on climate change and a freshman introductory course on chemical concepts. Both courses show how reflection can be used to connect student values to chemical content. The talk will also show how online learning environments can be used to incorporate new learning tools into the curriculum without distracting from chemical content.