P949: Business model approach to advanced analytical chemistry laboratory

Author: Susan Newton, John Brown University, USA

Co-Author: Carla Swearingen, John Brown University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 5:15 PM6:30 PM

Room: LIB

Related Symposium: S33

Goals for our advanced analytical chemistry laboratory include developing various skills such as: problem solving, laboratory, scientific writing and presentation, scientific literature, and professional conduct. To achieve these goals, the students were organized into laboratory teams each with a manager, research specialist, instrumental technician, and scientific writer. These positions rotated with each assignment. Each team was given a challenge in the form of a letter from a potential client with an analytical problem to solve. The students were required to research the problem and present a scientific literature-based protocol for acceptance. After approval of their protocol, they were trained in the operation of the chosen equipment and allowed to proceed. Their protocol and results were written in a report in a format suitable for publication in an ACS journal. Students are typically enthusiastic about this approach. Sample letters and reports will be presented.

P915: SUCCESS at JBU: Are we better preparing future scientists?

Author: Carla Swearingen, John Brown University, USA

Co-Author: Tim Wakefield and Cal Piston, John Brown University, USA

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 5:15 PM6:30 PM

Room: LIB

Related Symposium: S33

The Strengthening Undergraduate Curriculum and Community to Engage Science Students (SUCCESS) program at John Brown University (JBU) is funded by an NSF S-STEM Grant. Two cohorts of financially needy and academically talented undergraduate students majoring in Chemistry, Biochemistry, or Biology with a Chemistry minor (CBB) were awarded scholarships and participated in a targeted academic, professional, and extra-curricular program. The common experience and support facilitated by the SUCCESS Program were designed to meet three objectives: 1) increase the CBB persistence and graduation rates to a minimum of 80% and 65%, respectively; 2) improve the readiness of graduates to successfully enter the science-based workforce or graduate school; and 3) increase the number of educated scientists working in areas of technical need. Specific SUCCESS program elements include formation of a learning community through shared courses and labs as well as a weekly support seminar during the first semester; one-on-one faculty mentoring at least twice every semester; professional development seminars; tutoring for introductory chemistry, physics, and math courses; a variety of social activities; and opportunities to participate in science outreach activities. The first cohort of SUCCESS students will be graduating in May 2015. During this time (2011-present), we have collected data on retention, demographics, grade point averages, and student perceptions of the program. In addition, we have also undergone two external evaluations. We will present the most effective components of the program for meeting our three objectives and provide recommendations for institutionalizing best practices.

P191: Flipped vs. traditional general chemistry: What did students think and how did they do?

Author: Carla Swearingen, John Brown University, USA

Co-Author: Casey Einfalt, John Brown University, USA

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 10:15 AM10:35 AM

Room: LTT 101

Related Symposium: S21

The flipped classroom has been rapidly gaining in popularity over the last several years. However, because this method of teaching is relatively new, rigorous data on how well the flipped method functions in terms of student learning and perceived experience is scarce. We will present data on seventy-five students who were enrolled in a first semester general chemistry course that was half traditional lecture and half flipped. Test scores were collected and analyzed to determine if student performance was impacted by the method of instruction. In addition to quantitative data, students were also administered open-ended surveys about their experiences. Included were questions about how students used the videos, which delivery method they felt produced greater learning, and if they would prefer to be in a traditional lecture or flipped course. Preliminary analysis indicates some divergence between student learning gains and student perceptions of flipped versus traditional class sessions.