P737: Chemical equilibrium shift with MS Excel [WITHDRAWN]

Author: Bharath Sampath Kumar, University of Kentucky, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/6/14

Time: 10:15 AM10:35 AM

Room: LMH 176

Related Symposium: S55

The impact of digital technology on science education is more comprehensive than any curricular or instructional innovation in the history of education. Digital technologies have changed the ways teachers interact with students in a classroom. Students, who have periodically found chemistry concepts difficult, generally find it abstract, especially at the microscopic level. Chemical equilibrium is one such topic. Decades of research have identified numerous chemical equilibrium misconceptions among students and teachers at the high school and college level. Equilibrium is fundamental towards understanding of reactions of acid/base, oxidation/reduction, buffers, solubility etc. Students typically learn chemical equilibrium through the application of Le Chatelier’s principle in an algorithm form, meaning disturbing a chemical equilibrium would always have the same effect, irrespective of the nature of the chemical reaction. Due to its inadequacy, Le Chatelier’s principle can result in incorrect predictions about the effects of changes in concentration, volume, pressure, or temperature on chemical systems at equilibrium. While there are a handful of simulations and animations available as open source on the internet, they are built upon Le Chatelier’s principle. The paper will explore chemical equilibrium shifts from perspectives such as a) equilibrium law b) concept of reaction quotient and c) simplified Van’t Hoff equation. Mathematical functions and operations along with charts and graphs in MS EXCEL will be used to develop chemical equilibrium simulations. The simulation will allow students to modify the parameters mentioned above and observe how a chemical reaction re-establishes equilibrium.

P338: Teaching chemical equilibrium with technology

Author: Bharath Sampath Kumar, University of Kentucky, USA

Co-Author:

Date: 8/4/14

Time: 2:45 PM3:05 PM

Room: MAK BLL 126

Related Symposium: S30

Integration of technology in classroom instruction has created a major impact in the field of education from elementary to higher education levels. Effective use of technology can make abstract concepts accessible and apparent to students, and can support explorations of natural phenomena and offer opportunities for authentic problem solving. Students’ find chemistry concepts abstract and difficult to learn, especially at the microscopic level. Chemical equilibrium is one such topic. Research over the past several decades has identified numerous chemical equilibrium misconceptions among students and teachers at the high school and college level. Common areas of misconception identified by research with in chemical equilibrium include constant concentration, heterogeneous equilibrium, Le Chatelier’s principle, determination of equilibrium concentration, rate vs. extent of reaction, effect of catalyst etc. Research studies have identified key reasons behind misconceptions such as lack of systematic understanding of foundational chemistry concepts, failure to recognize the system is dynamic, solving numerical problems on chemical equilibrium in an algorithmic fashion, erroneous application Le Chatelier’s principle while determining equilibrium concentration, transfer of misconceptions from teachers to students through instruction. While research studies have explored the effectiveness of low-tech instructional strategies such as analogies, jigsaw, co-operative learning, and modeling using blocks, understanding heterogeneous dynamic equilibrium using technology is less explored. This paper will compare and contrast currently existing instructional tools and technologies for teaching chemical equilibrium and how developing new visual simulations along with low-tech instructional methods can influence the cognitive and affective domain in students.