P565: Standing on the shoulders: Integrating pre-requisite course concepts into teaching biochemistry

Author: Ann Taylor, Wabash College, USA

Co-Author: Walter Novak, Wabash College, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 2:25 PM2:45 PM

Room: HON 148

Related Symposium: S37

Biochemistry is a pre-requisite heavy discipline; it is built on the fundamentals of chemistry and biology. It is often the fifth chemistry-related course a student takes. But how much of what they learned in prior classes can they remember and apply in a new setting? Making these connections is a fundamental assumption in the constructivist model of learning. To help foster these connections, a collection of activities that explicitly link general and organic chemistry concepts to biochemistry ideas was written and either assigned as pre-class work or as discussion activities. A second strategy of regularly integrated clicker questions connecting pre-requisite concepts to course material was also used. Performance on a pre- and post-test covering key pre-requisite concepts, performance on Biochemistry exams, and student self evaluation of their confidence in the concepts from prior courses was collected to determine the effect of these homework assignments on their understanding of both the pre-requisite knowledge and the newly acquired information.

P567: Art of teaching biochemistry: Mentoring ASERT post-doctoral fellows

Author: Clarissa Sorensen-Unruh, Central New Mexico Community College, USA

Co-Author: Jayne Christen and Robert Taylor, University of New Mexico, USA

Date: 8/5/14

Time: 3:05 PM3:25 PM

Room: HON 148

Related Symposium: S37

As part of the Academic Science Education and Research Training program (funded by the National Institutes of Health) at the University of New Mexico, an experienced instructor (Clarissa Sorensen-Unruh) at Central New Mexico Community College, a Hispanic-Serving Institution, mentored two post-doctoral fellows (Jayne Christen and Robert Taylor) in the art of teaching an Organic and Biochemistry 1-semester class to first and second year undergraduate students. The mentoring process spanned an academic year (from Summer 2013-Spring 2014). Both the experienced instructor and mentees taught the course for the first time in Spring 2014. Innovative strategies for pedagogy and assessment were a substantial focus for the collaboration and will be presented. The perspectives of both the mentor and mentees, in addition to lessons learned and education research experiences, will also be shared.